How Baba made the young Adi to think only of God

 

[Anecdote of 1920s at Manzil-e-meem, Bombay]

Baba’s standing instruction to Adi Sr., Dr. Ghani and Ramjoo was that when they were free, they would have to sit near him in the prescribed manner: Adi on his right, Ghani in front of him, and Ramjoo to his left. They found this order very difficult and inconvenient to implement because, aside from when he was in the Manzil, they had to sit like this while traveling with him as well. Even when Baba was in the toilet, Adi had to occupy the right stall and Ramjoo the left one, as Ghani stood in front. Occasionally, they would take a different seat when permitted; but without his consent, they could not do so.

What was more alarming was that, at any time, Baba would suddenly ask them what they were thinking, and they were required to admit their dreadful thoughts. Once a week people would come for darshan, and very often this included attractive young ladies. One day a beautiful young woman came and bowed down to the Master. Adi was standing on Baba’s right and admiring the girl’s beauty; he had undesirable thoughts, and Baba turned to him and said, “What are you thinking?”

“Nothing,” said Adi. This probing went on for days and each time Adi would reply, “Nothing.”

Ghani Munsiff was also not free from such undesirable thoughts. Once Baba took them both aside and said, “Do you think I’m a fool? Do you think I don’t know what you’re thinking? I know everything. I know what you thought yesterday, I know what you are thinking today, and I know what you will think tomorrow. The past, present and future are open books to me.” He then startled both by narrating some intimate incidents in their lives that had occurred before they had met him – revealing the dates, locations and circumstances – information only they could have known. Both were dumbfounded as to how the Master could know these details and they began to weep.

“Don’t tell me lies. You two have been lying to me for days,” said Baba.

Adi blurted out, “Then don’t ask us such embarrassing questions in front of others!”

“Nothing of the sort.” Baba demanded. “I will ask you whatever and whenever I like. You must obey me!” And Baba did continue to probe them often, and they would openly confess their thoughts – good or bad.

Adi was going to college during the day, and Baba had instructed him to keep notes of all his thoughts during the six mile train journey to and from school. Adi therefore had to be careful of what he thought, for when Baba would read his notes, he would comment in a poignant manner, “Don’t you have any better things to think about than this?” Thus, Adi kept his mind preoccupied with thoughts of God, even when out of Baba’s presence.

–www.lordmeher.org,p391

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